Author's Info Blog

Sharing the things you want the world to know around the literary industry.

The Writer's Life 4/12

Unable to find any program to my liking last night at ten, I gave the remote a spin around channels not included amongst my favorites, and came upon Newt Gingrich giving an address at Wesley College in Delaware. He touched on the common conservative economic talking points: drilling, deregulation, lower taxes, elimination of the Capital Gains Tax, all of which I agree with. He also mentioned a way to tackle the college loan problem, which some predict will be worse than the mortgage debacle. He cited College of the Ozarks, in Missouri, which does not charge tuition for full time students. Instead, they must work 15 hours per week on campus, and two 40 hour weeks during school breaks. It dubs itself "Hard Work U." Unfortunately, it has an enrollment of only 1500. It is billed as a Christian Liberal Arts college. Wouldn't it be great if other schools experimented with...
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1780 Hits

The Writer's Life 4/7

Among Joanne's vast book donation to me were several by Joanne Fluke, who, like Diane Mott Davidson, specializes in culinary mysteries. Her heroine, Hannah Swenson, runs a cookie shop in a small Minnesota town, and solves murders on the side. It's silly, of course, but it's meant to be fun, not high art. I just finished the twelfth in the series, The Apple Turnover Murder (2010). She has written 15, as well as 30 other books. This one tried my patience. It concentrated much more on domestic issues and recipes than mystery. It was too light for my taste. She must have a solid fan base, given the amount of books she has written. I was unable to find any sales figures, so I assume she doesn't crack the best sellers list frequently. The characters consumed a lot of coffee and sweets. There was also a fondness for cats and dogs....
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  3221 Hits
3221 Hits

The Writer's Life 4/3

Last night the NYC PBS station ran back to back documentaries on literary marvels. The first was dedicated to Margaret Mitchell, author of the phenomenon Gone with the Wind (1936). Born in 1900, she was unconventional, the antithesis of the southern belle. She spent one year in college, which was notable only because she protested the presence of a black woman in one of her classes. GWTW would later be criticized for its portrayal of slaves and the KKK. Mitchell evolved later in life, donating money secretly to Morehouse College specifically to train black doctors. She also contributed to Atlanta's first hospital for blacks, also on the QT, wary of backlash. I've never read GWTW. I've suffered at least two viewings of the film, considered by many a classic, winner of many Oscars. It bored me. Since I know the storyline and don't anticipate any of the surprises that make literature...
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  3497 Hits
3497 Hits

The Writer's Life 4/2

I am fascinated by the irony that occurs in life. I, a pro-capitalism conservative, helped edit my friend Bob Rubenstein's The White Bridge, which is in large part an anti-capitalist screed. Now he has given a glowing review to my third novel, Killing, which is at the opposite end of the spectrum. Here is a link to the review: http://www.amazon.com/gp/pdp/profile/A1VVI4UPCSI0W4/ref=cm_cr_dp_pdp Food for thought from a discussion between conservatives Ann Coulter and Mike Gallagher this morning, which I believe they heard elsewhere: If the man who shot Trayvon Martin - Zimmerman - is a white Hispanic, does that mean President Obama is a white Afro-American? The floating bookshop battled a stiff northeast wind today. I thank Herbie and Mr. Almost for their purchases, and all the nice folks who voiced concern for my welfare. I spent the abbreviated session standing behind the corner of the apartment building where I usually set up,...
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  4987 Hits
4987 Hits

Selling My Books on the Streets of Brooklyn 3/29

I didn't anticipate much business at the floating bookshop today, as the wind was very brisk. Marie stopped by on her way to Manhattan to return items to Bed, Bath and Beyond. She described herself as an "impulse buyer." I'd never have guessed it. She seems so level-headed. She's been so kind to me, donating darn near 100 CDs and videotapes, most of which I've sold. And she bought A Hitch in Twilight, which she is currently enjoying, as is Mark, who also visited. He bought the collection almost two years ago and has finally gotten to it. He really enjoyed the second story, Defining Moment, which is about a whipping boy wrestler, although he believes the steroid angle briefly cited is "antiquated." Steroids saved his life. He opened up about himself as never before. About a decade ago he had a real drug problem. He kicked it cold turkey and...
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  13994 Hits
13994 Hits