Author's Info Blog

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The Writer's Life 7/23 - Sad

I just read about the penalties the NCAA imposed on the Penn St. football program. Wow - four-year probation, no league championship game appearances, no bowl appearances, a cut in scholarships, and the vacating of 111 wins since 1998. I didn't expect that last part. This knocks Joe Paterno from winningest coach in history to twelfth. According to Yahoo, Florida St.'s Bobby Bowden becomes the Division I leader with 377 wins, although Eddie Robinson had 408 at Grambling, which is also considered Division I, so I don't understand the discrepancy. I wonder if an asterisk and explanation will be placed in the record book next to Paterno's name. After all, he did earn those wins legitimately, despite his unacceptable behavior regarding the case. Perhaps this ugly, distressing story will now begin to fade into the background. Of course, the victims will have to cope with demons the rest of their lives....
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The Writer's Life 7/22 -

Here's another troubling sign for America: Last quarter 246,000 were added to the rolls of Social Security Disability. There were only 225,000 jobs created. The government printing press must be working overtime to cover all the outlays. I just read a recap of the British Open. Australian Adam Scott had a four shot lead with four holes to play, and bogeyed all four closing holes, while old favorite Easy Ernie Els made a birdie down the stretch to steal the storied championship. It must have been gut-wrenching drama. After last Monday's round, I commented how golf can be a cruel mistress. Although Scott is young, talented, rich and handsome, I feel for him. No matter what level one achieves, golf is fiercely psychological. No one can predict what will happen to Scott's game after this. He should use Rory McElroy as an example. The young Irishman, who collapsed in the final...
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The Writer's Life 7/21 - War

I needed a break from the sampling of mystery writers I've been doing the past few years. I was in the mood for serious fare. Among the donations given to me was Adolph Caso's The Straw Obelisk, which I'd never heard of. I balked when I read the jacket and saw that it was an anti-war novel. All reasonable people know that war is the worse thing imaginable. I need something more provocative than that. Fortunately, I told myself not to be so narrow-minded. After all, if I didn't like the book, I could always put it aside, although, anal retentive, I've done this only once in my life. I found Henry James' The Golden Bowl unreadable, its sentences convoluted beyond belief. Recently, World War II has been rehabbed by staunch liberals like Steven Spielberg (Saving Private Ryan), Tom Brokaw (The Greatest Generation) and Tom Hanks (Band of Brothers), excellent works...
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The Writer's Life 7/20 -

What's to be said when a maniac breaks down an emergency door of a theater, hurls a smoke bomb, and opens fire on innocents? The political arguments will rage. The left will demand greater gun control, the right slacker so that an armed citizen might kill or severely wound such a murderer before fatalities climb. I'm in the right's corner, although I doubt an armed citizen would have prevented much, if any, of the deaths in that theater. Then again, who knows? But I do believe that stricter gun laws would result in more incidents like this one. What a blot on humankind. Columbine, now this - maybe there's something in the drinking water in Colorado. I saw an interesting film last night, courtesy of Netflix. According to IMDb, Take Shelter (2011) had a budget of one million dollars and brought in just above that. A family man, 35, suffers nightmares....
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3521 Hits

The Writer's Life 7/19 - Procedures

I opened the floating book shop an hour later than usual. As expected, my friend passed her cardiograms with flying colors. Needless to say, she is pissed at her regular doctor's associate, who threw a scare into her without even taking her blood pressure or having enough imagination to discern that a person with a rare neurological disorder is vulnerable to unusual swelling. She underwent the tests so she wouldn't obsess about it, which she tends to do about anything important. It's just another example of how tax-payer money is squandered on unnecessary procedures. I had a visit from Morty, a retired salesman who recently completed a month of radiation treatment on a growth beneath his jaw. His appetite is returning. He is now able to consume more than Ensure. In fact, he went to the lobby of the apartment building nearby to pick up a flier that had a coupon...
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4670 Hits