Author's Info Blog

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The Writer's Life 6/19 - Heat

It's time for the network news broadcasts to go into panic mode - a heat wave is on the way. Expect updates and tips every few minutes. It's hot in the summer - who knew? I get a lot of political emails from friends. While I enjoy them, I don't pass most on. I made an exception with the following. If there is a good counter argument to this, I'm not aware of it. I'm not against illegal immigration, but I am against illegals getting government services: The owner of the Phoenix Suns Basketball team, Robert Sarver, came out strongly opposing Arizona's new immigration laws. Governor Jan Brewer released the following statement in response to Sarver's criticism: "What if the owners of the Suns discovered that hordes of people were sneaking into games without paying? What if they had a good idea who the gate-crashers are but the ushers and security...
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The Writer's Life 6/18 - Chips

I slummed on the golf course today. I would have had a good time if not for faulty chipping. I was so inept I needed at least eight extra chips during the round. It was a long day. There was an outing at our usual haunt, Forest Park, so we headed over to Kissena, which is in beautiful condition, especially its greens. It's a short course, par 64, but charming. A lot of the holes have bizarre lay-outs. Second shots are almost always a short iron. We waited at least an hour to play and were paired with a nice Asian couple, Willie and Shirley. Of course, goofballs that Cuz and I are we couldn't help but whisper Leslie Nielsen's immortal line from Airplane: "And don't call me Shirley." She was a good player, hitting it short and sweet a lot of the time, starting out at the same tee as...
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1721 Hits

The Writer's Life 6/16 - Beautiful People

Brett Easton Ellis burst onto the literary scene in 1985 at the tender age of 21 with his novel of immoral youths, Less Than Zero, which was adapted to film, starring Robert Downey Jr., two years later. In 1991 another novel, the violent American Psycho, caused a storm of controversy. It too was made into a film, starring Christian Bale. I did not read either of those books. I did see Less Than Zero, which I was unable to relate to, as the characters' lifestyle was so different from my own. Among a recent donation of books made by my friend Richie, who I coached at Lafayette H. S., was Ellis' Glamorama (1998). Not only did I not relate to any of the characters, I was puzzled by the mix of the surreal and real. I did not understand the meaning of the confetti and ice that was prevalent, nor the...
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4292 Hits

The Writer's Life 6/15 - Winners

I finally got around to viewing Hugo, courtesy of Netflix. Martin Scorsese abandoned his cynicism for this ode to creativity. In great part it is a tribute to film pioneer Georges Melies, who made the oft shown short highlighted by the shot of a rocket ship flying into the eye of the man on the moon. The film's chief attributes are its cinematography (Robert Richardson) and visual effects, both which won Oscars. It was awarded five in all. It is as beautiful-looking as any movie you will ever see. The story, based on a children's book by Brian Selznick, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, adapted for the screen by John Logan, is conventional, appealing but not engrossing. The great Ben Kingsley plays Melies. Christopher Lee, Ray Winstone and Jude Law bring their huge talents to small parts. Sacha Baron Cohen moves out of the realm of satire and into the role...
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1715 Hits

The Writer's Life 6/14 -


It's Flag Day. Three cheers for the red, white and blue, and all for which it stands. May American continue to be the world's beacon. "Freedom is not the natural state of mankind. It is a rare and wonderful achievement." - Milton Friedman. We are blessed to be living here. Here's a guy, like me, who made money on street corners. Vinnie the Retard was a legend in our section of Brooklyn, hanging out at the corner of 86th Street & Bay Parkway, singing and strumming on his guitar, which had only two or three strings. Everybody in the neighborhood knew him and many put money in his pocket. He has passed away and is missed. It's amazing how often he comes up in conversation. He made his mark, despite his handicap. May he rest in peace. We should all be remembered so fondly. Parking in Brooklyn is often frustrating. My...
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3657 Hits